Monthly Archives: July 2015

A field trip of prehistoric proportions

By Susan Hoffert, Foundation member Chequamegon Bay (pronounce it like you’re saying “she warm again” without the “R”) is one of my favorite spots in Wisconsin. As an obsessed birder, I have visited often in pursuit of piping plovers, golden eagles and blackburnian warblers. On a cool day in late May, however, my objective was not feathered, but finned. Well, maybe a more accurate description is “armored.” I pulled up to a small park in...

Traveling through time with the UWM weather station

By Lindsay Renick Mayer, Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin Cedarburg Bog State Natural Area is special for many reasons. It was the second place in Wisconsin to receive the state natural area designation. It is the most intact large bog in the southeastern part of the state. It contains what is likely North America’s southernmost string bog—a bog with stunted cedars and tamaracks that alternate in a unique pattern with wetter areas and sedges. And,...

Getting students outside: Peter Ostlind and the Teachers Outdoor Environmental Education Fund

By Brooke Hemze and Lindsay Renick Mayer, Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin When Peter Ostlind was invited to take a 45-minute hike with a full class of kindergarteners up the ridge adjacent to their school, he wasn’t sure what to expect. What he did know was that getting kids outdoors would benefit them in ways big and small, even helping to foster the next generation of conservationists. In the end the kids came together hiking...

Hunters of the sky and the human connection

By Jillaine Burton, Raptor Trainer and Educator, Open Door Bird Sanctuary Hunters of the Sky. What does that make you think of? Fighter planes? Pterodactyls? Drones? How about raptors or birds of prey? At the Open Door Sanctuary, we currently care for 11 raptors, all non-releasable for one reason or another, but still quite majestic in their own right. About 20 years ago when I first began to realize I had an affinity for nature,...

Better than Batman: Superheroic efforts to survey Wisconsin’s bats

By Lindsay Renick Mayer When the quiet of the night is interrupted by low, mechanical ticks, at first I almost miss it. “Big brown bat,” says Andrew Badje, a conservation biologist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, pointing to the squiggly lines moving across the screen of the noisy device he had hitched to the front of my kayak just moments before. I peer out over the lake to try to see the bat...