Monthly Archives: May 2016

Painting for conservation

By Rachel Hollingworth, Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin     Owen Gromme, hailed as the “Dean of U.S. Wildlife Artists,” had a longstanding presence in the State of Wisconsin as both an artist and an advocate for conservation. Born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, in 1896, Gromme began his career as a taxidermist for the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago at the age of 21. After serving in World War I, he worked...

Aldo Leopold Nature Center: A true Wisconsin landscape to host our 30th bash

By Rachel Hollingworth, Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin When we began to spearhead our big 30th anniversary event, we knew that location was key. Finding a place that had an atmosphere encompassing the natural charm of Wisconsin and a central location for all of our members sent us on a search for the very best that Dane County has to offer. The Aldo Leopold Nature Center’s beautiful landscapes and trails instantly caught our eye. Located...

Crane watching: One of nature’s many gifts

By Ronald L. Semmann, founding Foundation board member   “What are we doing out here?” I asked my ecologically inquisitive wife as we stumbled along the rain-soaked dike, feeling the occasional impact of small chunks of hail. “Did we make a mistake signing up for this thing.” “It’s going to be great,” she responded. “This is one of those rare chances to really enjoy nature.” We were talking about the great Sandhill Wildlife Area crane...

Wisconsin Master Naturalist Program: Valued volunteers

By Becky Sapper, University of Wisconsin Extension   Do you enjoy Wisconsin’s vast natural resources? Do you get energized by being outside? Are you a life-long learner, who wonders about nature? Do you like to make a difference? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you have something in common with Wisconsin’s 400 certified Master Naturalist Volunteers! Or, perhaps, you are already one of them. Volunteers have passion, interest and dedication and...

Mercury no longer marring Wisconsin’s loon population

By Molly Sequin   There’s something haunting about the beautiful call of a common loon. This sound, however, nearly vanished from Northern Wisconsin as a result of mercury and lead poisoning and hunting, all of which devastated loon populations starting in the late 1800s. Since then the federal government has taken steps to bring these birds back from the brink and conservationists in Wisconsin are embarking on a new Foundation-funded project to make sure those...