Wildlife

In support of rare and threatened wildlife

Wisconsin’s unique geography means our state is rich with wildlife species that live in different types of habitat. We are one of the only states with endangered species such as the Kirtland’s warbler, the whooping crane, the Poweshiek skipperling butterfly, and the rusty-patched bumble bee.

However, more than 400 Wisconsin species are considered Species of Greatest Conservation Need. This means that they are already listed as threatened or endangered, or that their populations are low or at risk, and will continue to decline without our help.

Dollars for wildlife

Wildlife projects funded

Dollars for bird conservation

Our wildlife strategy

Partnerships

We partner with existing organizations and agencies that are already engaged in wildlife work. By leveraging their skills, experience, and resources we can help do more for Wisconsin’s wildlife.

Habitat

Access to high quality habitat often decides the fate of our rare and threatened wildlife, which is why we focus our land efforts on the restoration of native plant communities and wildlife habitat.

Monitoring

The kind of research and conservation that makes a difference for wildlife takes time. We ensure long-term support for research and monitoring efforts to obtain meaningful outcomes.

Our wildlife support

Since 1986, we’ve contributed millions of dollars toward efforts to protect and restore Wisconsin’s most imperiled and ecologically important wildlife communities. Below is a small sample of the wildlife we have supported.

 

Help us save Wisconsin’s incredible diversity of wildlife.

Impact in Action

Saving the Endangered Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

One of the newest additions to the Endangered Species Act is found right here in Wisconsin: the rusty patched bumble bee (Bombus affinis) was added to the Endangered Species List on March 21, 2017, making it the first bee in history to be designated as an endangered species.

Read More
read more