By Diane Humphrey Lueck, chairwoman of the Foundation’s board of directors

As a fundraiser for the Foundation’s 30th anniversary this year, the chairwoman of our board of directors, Diane Humphrey Lueck, is creating a quilt to be auctioned off or raffled. Here she talks about her quilting style, fabric choices and the quilt’s symbolism.

Batik fabric

For the donation quilt, I chose to use batik fabric for the most part. Batiks are made with wax designs that go through the fabric, so the front and back are the same as contrasted with surface printed fabrics. The colors can be intense or subtle. The most important reason for me to use these for the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin quilt is that they are frequently designed with nature themes.

2-churn dash

I work in the “scrap” style of quilting.  That means lots of different pieces of cloth. This quilt has essentially red, blue and cream fabrics. However, as you can see above, red is represented by 20 different fabrics. The same with the many blues, and many creams or contrasting lights. A quilt like this could be stunning with just three fabrics, but I enjoy the feeling that the more fabrics I add, the better it all looks together.

3-star

I did the same “more is better” with the blocks. This quilt started with a basic pattern idea, and all the blocks have the “Ohio Star” outer edge, as shown above. The center of the star in each block is a 9-patch, with about a dozen different patterns within that constraint. Some of these are recognizable, like Shoo-fly and Churn Dash and Friendship Star. Others I just made up from whatever pieces I had at the point I sewed it all together. There’s a pattern block called Swamp Angel, which I felt was particularly appropriate for me. It’s the bottom right of the photo below.

4-swamp

For my quilts, I really enjoy having an eclectic mix of fabrics and patterns. That reflects my feeling about Foundation members. We are an eclectic mix, with many backgrounds. We each epitomize our special place or our special species in Wisconsin. Yet we all fit together to protect one beautiful, well-loved state. I hope this quilt can represent that.