Photo from Canva

Check out a sneak peak of our upcoming Ultimate Africa safari!

From teak forests to floodplains, the wonders of the diverse ecosystems of Hwange, Kafue, and Chobe national parks will leave you in awe.

In October 2020, we will be traveling from Zimbabwe to Zambia to Botswana, experiencing their movie-like landscapes and what makes them unique to Africa – take a look at a few tour highlights below.

Photo from Canva

One of the world’s last great elephant sanctuaries

Hwange National Park has more than 100 mammal species and over 400 species of birds. Home to one of the largest elephant populations in Africa, estimated at over 45,000 elephants, this park provides you with an inside look to how animal species such as these are protected.

Photo from Canva

Explore the pristine wilderness at Kafue National Park

Named after the Kafue River, this little-known park is on the rise. You will be likely to spot many native antelope as they live here in abundance. With a smaller tourist population this allows you more time to discover all the park has to offer; untouched flora and fauna and unexplored terrain are waiting to be discovered.

Photo from Canva 

Four distinct ecosystems – one great park

Chobe National Park was Botswana’s first national park and consists of four unique areas: Ngwenzumba Pans, Linyanti, Savute and the Chobe Riverfront. From dense woodlands to the lush floodplains to the Chobe River, each region is dramatically different from the last.

Chobe also has such a high-density animal population that you can’t go more than a few feet without seeing wildlife!

Photo from Canva

Lions, Cheetahs, and Elephants – Oh My!

Witness lions, cheetahs, elephants, Cape buffalo, crocodiles, antelope, and a stunning variety of birdlife on game-viewing excursions at each park. This close-up experience will educate you on how these animals interact and thrive in their habitats. Most importantly, you will see why it is so crucial that we protect them. 

 

“The smoke that thunders”

Victoria Falls is twice the height of Niagra Falls and considered to be the largest in world. We’ll hike to different lookout points and cruise along the Zambezi River, seeing firsthand why local tribes used to call the waterfall Mosi-o-Tunya, or “the smoke that thunders.” As one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the world, it is a sight worth seeing!

Explore a vast wetland wilderness by mokoros

By mokoros, or traditional dugout canoes, we will explore the wildlife of the Okavango Delta. The world’s largest inland river delta, the Okavango is made up of interconnecting waterways, lagoons, and islands. Due to it’s size, it makes one of the best places to view large populations of Africa’s wildlife.

Are you ready for an adventure?

By traveling with us, you’ll have intimate, unique experiences abroad that are always focused on nature, wildlife, and the conservation efforts of other organizations. With a limit of 16 travelers, our small-group atmosphere allows you to get closer to your guide, each other, and, most importantly, nature.

From exploring wild Alaska, to witnessing the monarch migration in Mexico, to birding in Costa Rica, we have some incredible destinations for you to choose from for your next adventure! 

Written by Hannah Schroepfer, Communications Assistant

The Wisconsin Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Fund

This endowment fund will provide sustainable support to protect Wisconsin’s turtles, toads, frogs, lizards, snakes, and salamanders for future generations.

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