Photo by Frank Ravizza from Pixabay

From ancient seas to windblown deserts . . .

The southwest lures millions of people every year to experience nature’s artistry of western landscapes of canyons, mountains, buttes and wide-open spaces.

These awe-inspiring places tell a spectacular story of the changing Earth, from ancient seas to windblown deserts, ancient ecosystems populated with dinosaurs and reptiles, and even mass extinction events.

In March 2020, we will be travelling to Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, and Monument Valley Navajo Park with professional naturalist Paul Regnier and professional geologist Dr. Roger Kuhns, and we wanted to share a few tour highlights below.

Read on for some little known facts about these national treasures! 

Photo by Will Dougherty

Utah’s First National Park

Zion National Park was Utah’s first national park! The park was first protected in 1909 by President William Howard Taft and designated Mukuntuweap National Monument. Ten years later it was established as Zion National Park by President Woodrow Wilson.

Photo by MAlder from Pixabay

HooDoo You Do?

These striking formations known as hoodoos are irregularly eroded spires of rocks. Bryce Canyon is home to the largest concentration of hoodoos found anywhere on Earth!

National Park Service Photo.

The “Great Unconformity”

The Grand Canyon offers one of the most visible examples of a worldwide geological phenomenon known as the “Great Unconformity,” in which there is a gap in the rock record between Cambrian and pre-Cambrian times. What happened during the hundreds of millions of years between remains a mystery.

Photo by Brigette Werner from Pixabay.

Do you recognize this iconic monument?

Even if you haven’t visited Monument Valley, you may be familiar with its features. Since John Ford filmed Stagecoach in 1938, it has appeared in movies, TV shows, commercials and computer screen savers. It has become an iconic representation of the American West.

Photo by Skeeze from Pixabay.

Are you ready for an adventure?

By traveling with us, you’ll have intimate, unique experiences abroad that are always focused on nature, wildlife, and the conservation efforts of other organizations.

From exploring wild Alaska, to witnessing the monarch migration in Mexico, to experiencing an African safari, we have some incredible destinations for you to choose from for your next adventure!

Written by Kim Kreitinger, Outreach Coordinator

Exploring the Canyonlands of the Southwest

The southwest is home to some of America’s most iconic landscapes, as well as several stunning national parks. In March 2020, we will be travelling to Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, and Monument Valley Navajo Park with professional naturalist Paul Regnier and professional geologist Dr. Roger Kuhns.

NRF board member Bill Smith named to Natural Resources Board

NRF board member Bill Smith has recently been appointed to the Natural Resources Board (NRB), the governing body of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Hundreds of ‘Birdathonners’ Raise Funds for Bird Conservation Efforts in Wisconsin

The Great Wisconsin Birdathon is one of the most popular “bird-a-thon” style fundraisers in the nation, bringing in over $400,000 since it was created in 2012 to raise funds for bird protection efforts for Wisconsin birds.

A Walk Through Time and Hemlocks

All of this beautiful snow here in Madison reminds me of a winter trip I took to northern Wisconsin, when I had the opportunity to explore a new place: Germain Hemlocks State Natural Area in Oneida County.

Grant from REI makes a deep impact at Wisconsin’s beloved Devil’s Lake State Park

Devil’s Lake State Park is one of the most highly visited and cherished public properties in Wisconsin. Funding from REI was used to complete critical restoration activities.

NRF co-founder retires from board after more than 30 years

Ron Semmann helped create the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin while working at the Department of Natural Resources in 1986 and has served on the Board ever since. Ron is now ready to enjoy a much-deserved retirement and offers this message to all NRF members, partners, staff, and board.

Diversity, equity, and inclusion in conservation

It is vitally and increasingly important to consider diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in our changing world. According to data from the 2010 U.S. Census, more than 25 percent of children in Wisconsin are people of color. That means the future of conservation depends upon making conservation relevant and meaningful to all Wisconsinites.

Wisconsin’s threatened reptiles

We have 36 species of reptiles in Wisconsin and more than half of them are listed as endangered, threatened, or a species of special concern. These animals are vulnerable and critically important to the health and balance of our ecosystems.

2018 CD Besadny Conservation Grant Awardees

The Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin has awarded $28,043 to 30 organizations across Wisconsin through the C.D. Besadny Conservation Fund. The fund annually awards grants up to $1,000 that support grassroots conservation and education projects.

Jim Hlaban recognized as water hero

You can tell a lot about Jim Hlaban’s commitment to conservation from his email signature: “If we don’t do it, who will?” Jim and his wife, Mary, recently made a commitment to protect Wisconsin’s waters into perpetuity by creating the Wisconsin Water Protection Fund, which will make annual grants to numerous conservation organizations working to protect water resources across the state.