Photo by Frank Ravizza from Pixabay

From ancient seas to windblown deserts . . .

The southwest lures millions of people every year to experience nature’s artistry of western landscapes of canyons, mountains, buttes and wide-open spaces.

These awe-inspiring places tell a spectacular story of the changing Earth, from ancient seas to windblown deserts, ancient ecosystems populated with dinosaurs and reptiles, and even mass extinction events.

In March 2020, we will be travelling to Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, and Monument Valley Navajo Park with professional naturalist Paul Regnier and professional geologist Dr. Roger Kuhns, and we wanted to share a few tour highlights below.

Read on for some little known facts about these national treasures! 

Photo by Will Dougherty

Utah’s First National Park

Zion National Park was Utah’s first national park! The park was first protected in 1909 by President William Howard Taft and designated Mukuntuweap National Monument. Ten years later it was established as Zion National Park by President Woodrow Wilson.

Photo by MAlder from Pixabay

HooDoo You Do?

These striking formations known as hoodoos are irregularly eroded spires of rocks. Bryce Canyon is home to the largest concentration of hoodoos found anywhere on Earth!

National Park Service Photo.

The “Great Unconformity”

The Grand Canyon offers one of the most visible examples of a worldwide geological phenomenon known as the “Great Unconformity,” in which there is a gap in the rock record between Cambrian and pre-Cambrian times. What happened during the hundreds of millions of years between remains a mystery.

Photo by Brigette Werner from Pixabay.

Do you recognize this iconic monument?

Even if you haven’t visited Monument Valley, you may be familiar with its features. Since John Ford filmed Stagecoach in 1938, it has appeared in movies, TV shows, commercials and computer screen savers. It has become an iconic representation of the American West.

Photo by Skeeze from Pixabay.

Are you ready for an adventure?

By traveling with us, you’ll have intimate, unique experiences abroad that are always focused on nature, wildlife, and the conservation efforts of other organizations.

From exploring wild Alaska, to witnessing the monarch migration in Mexico, to experiencing an African safari, we have some incredible destinations for you to choose from for your next adventure!

Written by Kim Kreitinger, Outreach Coordinator

The Wisconsin Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Fund

This endowment fund will provide sustainable support to protect Wisconsin’s turtles, toads, frogs, lizards, snakes, and salamanders for future generations.

Backyard Birding with the Great Wisconsin Birdathon

This year the Great Wisconsin Birdathon participants took part in the Backyard Birding Challenge, finding an incredible 185 species in their own backyards!

Celebrating Nelson Institute’s 50th Anniversary

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, the globally respected institution at the University of Wisconsin-Madison named after former Wisconsin Governor and U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson, the author of renowned environmental legislation and founder of Earth Day.

Tracking the Phantoms: A Red-shouldered Hawk Telemetry Study

In 2018 the Foundation helped fund the first attempt to monitor Wisconsin’s red-shouldered hawk with more advanced telemetry technology.

We’re Partnering up with Snapshot Wisconsin

We’re excited to announce that the Foundation is partnering with Snapshot Wisconsin to provide more volunteer opportunities for our members!

Feathers – Finders Keepers? Not Really . . .

For generations, feathers have been used in many decorative ways. Once removed from the bird, there is no way to know how they were acquired. The federal migratory bird act of 1972 put specific laws in place to protect all birds to keep them from being killed for their feathers.

Conservation Dogs Lend a Paw in Bumble Bee Surveys

Thanks to the incredible support from the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin’s Wisconsin Pollinator Protection Fund, Midwest Conservation Dogs, Inc. has begun training professional detection dogs to locate bumble bee nests.

Conservation, Community, and Racial Justice

Recent events have shined a light on the deeply ingrained injustices that people of color continue to face, particularly the black community. The discrimination, violence, and oppression have left me and my colleagues at the Foundation deeply disturbed. We are angry. We are sad. We also stand in solidarity with all who are working to assure social and racial justice.

7 Ways to Celebrate Earth Day’s 50th Anniversary

While most Earth Day in-person and large events have been canceled, the celebration of the nation-wide event that began right here in Wisconsin continues. 

14 Things We ❤️ About Wisconsin

To celebrate Valentine’s Day we have compiled a list of 14 things we love about our valentine—Wisconsin.